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Time: Teaching time can be maximised by developing strong relationships with the arts industry.

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  • Author :  admin
  • Date :  Feb 03, 2013
  • Views :  3261
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Managing Time

Managing Time
Building Arts Partnerships


Why develop arts partnerships?

Teachers in schools are at the heart of providing arts learning that is rich, sustained and rigorous. Teaching time can be maximised by developing strong relationships with the arts industry through programs, Relationships or associations between schools and other agencies. and through the use of specialist arts services for schools.

The Australian Curriculum: The Arts allows for mutual professional development opportunities between teachers, professional artists and arts organisations to further students' learning and experiences in the arts. These relationships connect classrooms to 21st century arts practices and strengthen the opportunities the arts offer young Australians. Students gain real world experience and enhance their Capacity and skill to observe, imagine and engage in expressive experiences where sentiment, interpretations and emotional responses are accessed. when they work alongside practising professionals.

Arts partnerships provide models of how the arts relate to life beyond school, and enrich not only the educational experience of students, but also the life of the community. Respect for and understanding and celebration of The variety of human societies or cultures in a specific region or in the world as a whole, including values, beliefs, practices and expression. and the interconnected nature of art and culture may be explored in meaningful ways through relationships with representatives and artists from cultures within and outside the school community. Partnerships with Aboriginal communities, Torres Strait Islander communities and Asian communities, in particular, provide essential learning opportunities for schools and promote these Aspects of the Australian Curriculum that are to be given special attention and should be embedded in all learning areas. (Australian Curriculum, Assessment and Reporting Authority: Cross-curriculum priorities) for all national curriculum learning areas.

What does research tell us about the impact of arts partnerships?

The report Partnerships Between Schools and the Professional Arts Sector (2009) discusses international research highlighting the following positive benefits of creative arts partnerships in schools:

  • broadening the school's approach to teaching and learning
  • forming Connections across the curriculum between different learning areas.
  • enabling the school to focus on creativity
  • improving provision for the arts
  • enhancing the school’s image/profile
  • unifying the whole school in a common purpose. (p. 7)

What are the most effective strategies for building quality arts partnerships?

A strong partnership between schools and outside arts and community organisations can support and maximise time for quality arts education. Such partnerships involve getting to know each other, gaining understanding about what each partner can offer and might gain from working together, and how partners can jointly enhance arts learning. While insights into arts practices can be enhanced by bringing artists into schools including Schools may engage an artist or group of artists to work with their students. programs, possibilities for works of art and art spaces beyond the classroom should also be explored. This can include workplaces of artists, community spaces and Artwork that is realised or carried out chiefly in an electronic medium..

Clarity about purpose, plans, roles, communication and outcomes is important. Strategies and questions to consider when developing quality arts partnerships are located in the supporting documents.





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This project is funded by the Australian Government Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations.